One of My Favorite Mindfulness Meditations : Kate Murphy Therapy
Science links mindfulness practices, including meditation, to reduction in anxiety, depression, ADHD, and chronic pain symptoms.
anxiety reduction, meditate to reduce anxiety, anxiety, fight or flight response, depression, ADHD, meditation, self-compassion, self-care, reduce rumination, psychotherapy, counseling, Kate Murphy LMSW, Atlanta Metro, Gwinnett County
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One of My Favorite Mindfulness Meditations

One of My Favorite Mindfulness Meditations

I meditate less often than I would like. I’ve mentioned in past blogs that my days are better when I meditate for 10 to 30 minutes in the morning. I’m more focused and less likely to get wrapped up in worrying thoughts. It’s easier to be present for other people and myself.

Science links mindfulness practices, including meditation, to reduction in anxiety, depression, ADHD, and chronic pain symptoms. However, I often hear people say, “I tried that meditation stuff and I just couldn’t do it, my mind is too busy.”

Remember: 

Your mind should be having thoughts. It means that you’re alive. The goal of mindfulness meditation is not to have zero thoughts. It is to observe your thoughts rather than ruminating.

It’s also helpful to remember that meditation practice is just that – a practice. And while practice does not make “perfect,” it does increase ability. What meditation allows is for us to learn how to better observe our thoughts rather than get pulled down into them. It’s a choice.

 

Observe:

Be the observer of your thoughts rather than be your thoughts. One of my favorite meditations for illustrating this is “Leaves on a Stream.” The idea is to see thoughts as what they are such as “fear,” not as what they say they are such as “you will fail if you try.” Taking thoughts at face value creates barriers in our life that can keep us from truly enjoying things like accomplishment and connection.

Meditate – Just Hit Play:

Place those negative and busy thoughts on a leaf and let them have a lovely float down the stream.

For more information:

Workbook, Get Out of Your Mind and Into Your Life – The New Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, by Steven C. Hayes, PhD with Spencer Smith

 

Kate Murphy, LMSWKate Murphy Therapy

Kate Murphy, a therapist in Berkeley Lake, specializes in helping you decrease stress and anxiety. You can live a more balanced, connected, and meaningful life. Kate works with individuals and couples over the age of 18 to support healing, communicating, and experiencing joy more often.

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